Happiness is…Breakfast Udon Noodles

It's easy to turn leftover udon or ramen into Breakfast Noodles.

I tend to eat things in phases. One week, I’m totally into salty foods like potato chips or popcorn. The next week it might be dark and sweet French hot chocolate or salted caramel ice cream.

This week, probably because I’ve been super busy, I’ve gotten into building meals around poached eggs. Eggs are such a lovely and complete food, a quick way to get protein and get on with the day.

And I think eggs are just beautiful, especially if you can get ones from a farmer’s market or a friend who has chickens. The yolks on those are such a fantastic shade of marigold orange, like the label on a bottle of Veuve Clicquot. But even grocery store eggs are pretty, with their cheerful yellow yolks surrounded by soft, chalk-colored whites.

To make my Breakfast Udon NoodlesI started with a reheated bowl of leftover plain udon and broth from Geta, my super-cute neighborhood Japanese restaurant. I ate half of them last night and of course when all the toppings were gone, I sort of lost interest.

My favorite Japanese noodles are topped with pork belly a la Momofuku or Daikokuya Ramen in LA. Since I didn’t have a slab of that lying around, I cut up a piece of thick-cut bacon and tried to cook it slowly, so it stayed tender.

Poach an egg by adding 1 inch of water to a shallow pot or frying pan with a light bottom. Turn it on high, and once it starts to simmer, but not quite boil, add a splash of vinegar. This keeps the egg yolk from spreading all over. Now carefully drop in the egg. It will start turning white as it cooks from the edges to the middle. Spoon a little water over the top of the egg, and use the spoon to move the egg around a bit, so it releases from the pan. When most of the white is set, it’s done.

I topped my noodles with the bacon and poached egg, along with some chopped green onions and a few shakes of shichimi togarashi, a Japanese seven-spice powder.

It’s brothy, spicy, bacon & eggy and easy: I’m happy.

Author: Maria Colette Hunt

Maria Hunt — aka The Bubbly Girl — believes pork should be its own food group, bubbly is meant for sipping anytime and the Sicilians got it right when they made ice cream a breakfast food. She's a cultural food writer, mixologist, author, first level sommelier and hostess of The Bubbly Girl.com. Her adventures have included cooking with Alice, drinking with Tony and sea urchin fishing with Wolfgang. Haute cuisine is cool, but the Chicago native still hasn't lost a taste for pan pizza, her dad's barbecue ribs and a good Polish. The meal she still dreams about is chile relleno soup in the back of a second hand store in Ensenada.

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